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Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has once again proven its dominance of Japan’s political landscape. Before the election, there was a speculation that the LDP would lose seats amid scandals surrounding Abe and his wife, but this did not eventuate. Instead, the sudden disbandment of the largest opposition party, the Democratic Party (DP), befuddled public attitudes before the election.

The establishment of Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike’s Party of Hope — which scalped candidates from the centre-right factions of the DP — failed to challenge the LDP. As a result, this election was conducted without a large opposition party capable of replacing the LDP and providing an alternative political orientation.

So where to now for Japan’s party system? The answer at this stage is not clear, but Japan’s attempt to create a two-party system following the 1993 electoral reform faces a critical juncture. Read more

Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has once again proven its dominance of Japan’s political landscape. Before the election, there was a speculation that the LDP would lose seats amid scandals surrounding Abe and his wife, but this did not eventuate. Instead, the sudden disbandment of the largest opposition party, the Democratic Party (DP), befuddled public attitudes before the election.

The establishment of Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike’s Party of Hope — which scalped candidates from the centre-right factions of the DP — failed to challenge the LDP. As a result, this election was conducted without a large opposition party capable of replacing the LDP and providing an alternative political orientation.

So where to now for Japan’s party system? The answer at this stage is not clear, but Japan’s attempt to create a two-party system following the 1993 electoral reform faces a critical juncture.

Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has once again proven its dominance of Japan’s political landscape. Before the election, there was a speculation that the LDP would lose seats amid scandals surrounding Abe and his wife, but this did not eventuate. Instead, the sudden disbandment of the largest opposition party, the Democratic Party (DP), befuddled public attitudes before the election.

The establishment of Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike’s Party of Hope — which scalped candidates from the centre-right factions of the DP — failed to challenge the LDP. As a result, this election was conducted without a large opposition party capable of replacing the LDP and providing an alternative political orientation.

So where to now for Japan’s party system? The answer at this stage is not clear, but Japan’s attempt to create a two-party system following the 1993 electoral reform faces a critical juncture.