Select Page

Outlook for thawing Japan-China ties still fragile: The first visit to China by a Japanese foreign minister in two years has signaled a thaw in ties between Beijing and Tokyo amid continuing rows over territorial and historical issues.

But some political experts remain skeptical about whether China-Japan relations will further improve, given their deep-rooted disputes and differences in regional strategies.

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono’s visit to Beijing comes at a time when Japan and China mark 40 years since the signing of a bilateral peace and friendship treaty, and after both Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have bolstered their domestic power base.

Optimism has grown about the future course of Sino-Japanese relations, as Xi and Abe are expected to be able to move ahead with negotiations on various matters in an atmosphere where the two can exert strong leadership.

Fears about North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear ambitions have also prompted Beijing, the main economic lifeline for Pyongyang, and Tokyo to work together to maintain security in East Asia.

On Sunday, Kono agreed with his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi that Beijing and Tokyo will make efforts to improve ties and resume reciprocal visits by the two countries’ leaders. Read more

Read also:  Abe urges realism on nuclear disarmament

Outlook for thawing Japan-China ties still fragile: The first visit to China by a Japanese foreign minister in two years has signaled a thaw in ties between Beijing and Tokyo amid continuing rows over territorial and historical issues.

But some political experts remain skeptical about whether China-Japan relations will further improve, given their deep-rooted disputes and differences in regional strategies.

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono’s visit to Beijing comes at a time when Japan and China mark 40 years since the signing of a bilateral peace and friendship treaty, and after both Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have bolstered their domestic power base.

Optimism has grown about the future course of Sino-Japanese relations, as Xi and Abe are expected to be able to move ahead with negotiations on various matters in an atmosphere where the two can exert strong leadership.

Fears about North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear ambitions have also prompted Beijing, the main economic lifeline for Pyongyang, and Tokyo to work together to maintain security in East Asia.

On Sunday, Kono agreed with his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi that Beijing and Tokyo will make efforts to improve ties and resume reciprocal visits by the two countries’ leaders